Thursday, December 31, 2009

The Ole Standby Dadventure: The Boston Children's Museum, Boston, MA

























Sydney made a beeline for the "encapsulated stairs of death," (thanks New Balance), the minute we walked in the place. I might have preferred a free climb at
Otter Cliffs in Acadia, at least there he would only fall into a raging sea.

The Boston Children's Museum
308 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210


It's day seven of vacation, ice skating at Babson is a no-go and the Farnsworth Museum won't open 'till noon. What is it about the Boston Children's Museum that makes it the fallback every rainy/cold, weekend/vacation day? Is it the millions of exhibits for ages 1-15? Is it that Flour Bakery and Cafe is the last finishing touch on making Fort Point a hipster hangout after this museum suffered years as the only outpost in a desolate wasteland? Perhaps it is the temptation of the incredibly cool and everlasting icon of Boston, the Hood milk bottle.


Whatever the reason, we always run into everyone we know and a million other folks whether on a weekday or weekend. We noted that Peep's World was a nice new addition of splashing and shadows. The Science Playground is always a great introduction to everything from mechanical physics to the habitat of turtles. Of course we always make sure to hit the dance floor at Kid Power. But, a baby no more, Elijah is so over the toddler Play Space.

As you can see, he much preferred hitting the aerospace with Arthur and Friends. (We're still a little obsessed with Arthur's Tooth, by Marc Brown from this summer even though none of us should be losing them anytime soon). But, what I am waiting
for patiently on pins and needles is the day that they are ready to construct a giant cyborg out of the remnants of the local industrial shops in the area at the Recycle Shop. Maybe, just maybe it will be the next rainy/cold weekend/vacation day when we have nothing better to do than fallback on an old friend.




1 comments:

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